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MYG1, novel melanocyte related gene, has elevated expression in vitiligo

      Vitiligo is an acquired, idiopathic disorder characterized by depigmentation of skin caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. The genetics of vitiligo cannot be explained by simple Mendelian genetics; it is characterized by incomplete penetrance, multiple susceptibility loci and genetic heterogeneity. Linkage and association studies have provided strong support for vitiligo susceptibility genes on chromosomes 4q13–q21, 1p31, 7q22, 8p12 and 17p13 [
      • Zhang X.J.
      • Chen J.J.
      • Liu J.B.
      The genetic concept of vitiligo.
      ,
      • Spritz R.A.
      The genetics of generalized vitiligo and associated autoimmune diseases.
      ]. Several other loci of interest require further follow-up studies. In humans, MYG1 (melanocyte proliferating gene 1, also known as Gamm1 or C12orf10 NM_021640) is located on chromosome 12q13, a region linked to Triple A syndrome (AAAS, OMIM 231550) with hyperpigmentation often present in Triple A patients [
      • Clark A.J.L.
      • Weber A.
      Adrenocorticotropin insensitivity syndromes.
      ]. Chromosomal region 12q13–14 is commonly found to be altered in melanomas [
      • Zuo L.
      • Weger J.
      • Yang Q.
      • Goldstein A.M.
      • Tucker M.A.
      • Walker G.J.
      • et al.
      Germline mutations in the p16INK4a binding domain of CDK4 in familial melanoma.
      ].
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