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Protective effect of autophagy in particulate matter-induced hair loss

  • Da-Ae Yu
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea

    Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Sunhyae Jang
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

    Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea

    Institute of Human Environment Interface Biology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Jungyoon Ohn
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

    Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea

    Institute of Human Environment Interface Biology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Sungjoo Tommy Hwang
    Affiliations
    Dr. Hwang's Hair-Hair Clinic, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Ohsang Kwon
    Correspondence
    Correspondence to: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744, South Korea.
    Affiliations
    Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

    Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea

    Institute of Human Environment Interface Biology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

    Genomic Medicine Institute, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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      Particulate matter (PM) is among the leading environmental causes of diseases worldwide, and increases mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases [
      • Cohen A.J.
      • Brauer M.
      • Burnett R.
      • Anderson H.R.
      • Frostad J.
      • Estep K.
      • et al.
      Estimates and 25-year trends of the global burden of disease attributable to ambient air pollution: an analysis of data from the global burden of diseases study 2015.
      ]. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests that PM is related to hair growth. PM of small diameters can penetrate hair follicles (HFs) in vivo and induce cutaneous inflammatory responses [
      • Jin S.P.
      • Li Z.
      • Choi E.K.
      • Lee S.
      • Kim Y.K.
      • Seo E.Y.
      • et al.
      Urban particulate matter in air pollution penetrates into the barrier-disrupted skin and produces ROS-dependent cutaneous inflammatory response in vivo.
      ]. Recently, an epidemiological study demonstrated that PM concentration partially corresponds to the flare pattern of alopecia areata, the most common inflammatory hair loss disorder [
      • Lee Y.B.
      • Lee W.S.
      Alopecia areata and particulate matter: a 5-year retrospective study in Korea.
      ]. However, the effect of PM on hair growth remains largely unknown.

      Abbreviations:

      ACTB (beta-actin), ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5), AV (autophagic vacuole), CQ (chloroquine), HF (hair follicle), LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta), ORS (outer root sheath), PM (particulate matter), si-ATG5 (siRNA against ATG5), si-control (siRNA with scrambled oligonucleotides), siRNA (small interfering RNA), SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1)
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